A December Pasture Check

As we dive straight into December and busy ourselves getting ready for the coming holiday, it serves me well to take notice of my friends in the pasture. These days are short on sunshine, but when it is out, the animals are too; napping, exploring, nibbling or just hanging out. All seem content, and not the least bit stressed. I for one am looking at the time left and trying to figure how I am going to get all the knitting, embroidery and crafting done to complete the gifts I am planning to make. But these fuzzy critters are not frazzled.

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Hickory is enjoying his stay in the “honeymoon suite”. He is assigned to be dad of the spring lambs because of his soft moorit brown fleece and all around good looks and sweet personality. I would really like more brown lambs to have more brown yarn and roving on hand. He is enjoying the company of four ewes, Pansy, Dahlia, Gwyneth, and Motto.

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Estelle, Ettienne and Rupert heading out for a day of free ranging.

The duck trio are our newest residents. They were rescue ducks from Wildlife Rehabilitation. They usually rescue and doctor injured wild animals. But these three were domestic ducks that were neglected and one was attacked by a dog. All were in sad shape. But they were recovered and needed a forever home. We were chosen because of our ponds. But they actually prefer bathing and swimming in their tub. They take turns jumping in and splash around as only one can fit at one time. I have nicknamed them the bucket ducks. They have settled into their routine. They head back to the barn at night to be go to bed protected in one of the stalls. So they are there by dusk without me having to herd them back. And I am excited to report that Estelle is now laying eggs for the first time.

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Chickens are almost full grown!

The bantam chickens are just about full grown now. And I have to say, they are so delightful in how they all get along and play together. I wish I were so care free. I am eagerly waiting eggs, but in the meantime, I am enjoying their antics.

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Bluebelle and Lily eager for breakfast

The growing lambs are getting used to their new haircuts. We sheared a couple of weeks ago and I understand that lambs should go through a growth spurt after shearing. They look so sweet as they go about looking for food, take naps in the sun and even spar with each other. I am amused as I see baby ewes butt heads like rams. And they take their sparring seriously. Yet are friends after the battle.

So I am refreshed after visiting and feeding everyone this morning. Now back to speed knitting.

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About woolfarmgal

In middle age, had the courage to follow my heart-raise sheep, goats and rabbits and build a business around fiber. In the process, discovered an outlet for creativity. I not only knit, I spin, dye yarn, roving and felt, I also now knitting Shetland Wool socks on my antique sock machine called 1910 Socks. I also design patterns for knitting. You can find my products on my Etsy shop, Sweet Tree Hill Farm. And I teach many of these skills. My bliss is working where I live, having sheep as co-workers and sharing all of this with other fiber enthusiasts.

Posted on December 3, 2013, in In the Pasture and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I love that photo of the bucket ducks! Bet it would make a great print for sale in your shop. 🙂 Actually all your photos look gorgeous Kathy! Those lambs must be a handful. I keep toying with the idea of a few urban chickens. We’re allowed up to ten in Vancouver…but no roosters. Would be great just to even have three or four. 🙂 But there’s so much I don’t know about keeping chickens and Morgan, one of my cats, would probably worry them to death! Hope you have a lovely week ahead.

    • Hi Veronica, so nice to hear from you. Chickens are one of the easiest livestock to take care of. Predators, like kitties and dogs and in my case, the occasional hawk is the biggest concern. A coop with a connected chicken run would solve that. I have two small coops with mini runs, then around them is a chicken fence that keep them contained and helps with dogs and cats and gives them the feel of free range. It is not perfect, as proven by the aforementioned hawk. And I needed to choose chicken breeds that are not flighty so they won’t hop the fence. But the system gets them back into their coops at night, the most vulnerable time.
      I have been toying with creating cards or other products with the best photos. Need to investigate more. Always looking for new ideas, so please chime in anytime.

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